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Find your
perfect home.
LET'S TALK

Congratulations

on your decision to purchase the home of your dreams! The buying process is complex, therefor Kendra Havemeier can help you navigate your way to finding your perfect home. There is a lot to buying a home, so start your experience here and feel free to contact us to help you!

Let’s make this simple

With Havemeier at your side, you can be confident that her team will find you the perfect home that fits your life, your budget, and your future.

Buyer’s Agent Disclosure

“A Buyer’s Agent acts solely on behalf of the buyer and owes duties to the buyer which include the utmost good faith, loyalty, and fidelity. The agent will negotiate on behalf of and act as an advocate for the buyer.”

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“Kendra is such a pleasure to work with. From start to finish, she helped my husband and I through every step of the process in buying our first home.

~ Alex Grindle

What we do for clients

MAKE APPOINTMENTS to show you homes listed in the Multiple Listing Service, new  homes that are still builder owned and may not be advertised on the internet, and any homes that are For Sale By Owner that meets your criteria.

ARRANGE FOR MEETINGS with custom builders if appropriate.

RESEARCH any neighboring associations, water districts, well permits, or other questions you may have before choosing to write an offer.

PROVIDE INFORMATION on the dangers of radon, lead-based paint, asbestos, and meth through local professionals.

ARRANGE YOUR MEETING with a lender to find out how much home you can afford to buy and get your prequalification letter.

HELP YOU NARROW YOUR SEARCH by identifying what is most important to you in a home or real estate investment.

SET UP AUTOMATED SEARCHES so that you will be notified right away when a new home meeting your criteria comes on the market.

PROVIDE A CONVENIENT WEBSITE  where you can change and save as many custom searches as you like.

RECOMMEND QUALITY TITLE COMPANIES, home inspectors, and any other specialists needed to vet the home for any latent defects.

Let’s talk about the buying process

PRE-APPROVAL

Getting Pre-Approved

It is extremely important that you connect with a qualified mortgage lender and get pre-approved for a loan before you start your home search. The pre-approval process can be quick and give you the answers you need to get started looking for the right property. Talking to a good, local mortgage lender about your loan options not only gives you a target on price, but the type of property as well. Some homes don’t qualify for certain types of financing and it’s crucial for you and your REALTOR® to know right up front what are going to be the best home or investment options for you.

The Pre-Approval Process Will Help You in the Following Ways:

• You will know in advance what your payments will be.
• You won’t waste time considering homes you cannot afford.
• You will get your credit score so the lender can determine your interest rate.
• There are many loan options and programs to choose from in today’s market. Your lender will explain the alternatives to help you select the one best suited for you.
• Almost no one will accept your offer without a pre-approval letter attached.
• You’ll have a good faith estimate, showing you the terms of the loan, the closing costs and we will explain them to you in detail.
• You’ll have peace of mind!

DO’s During the Loan Process

DO stay current on your payments. If you’re looking to refinance, make sure you’re still paying your mortgage on time; one late notice may cost you. The same goes for car payments, credit cards, student loans, and any other debt.
DO use your credit as normal. Changing your pattern may raise a red flag, causing your credit score to go down.
DO wait to make a major purchase such as a new car, boat or appliance until after your loan has funded.

DON’Ts During the Loan Process

DON’T keep cash in a safe or an overseas account if you plan to use these funds as a down payment. Inquire about how and when would be the best time to put funds into your U.S. bank account if needed.
DON’T apply for new credit, loans or give your personal information to anyone else who might run your credit report. Multiple credit
inquiries may hurt your score.
DON’T make career moves. Your mortgage lender must verify your employment, so it’s crucial to maintain your employment status.
DON’T make large deposits into your bank account unless 100% necessary. If you must, save the documentation showing where the funds came from.

BEFORE YOU WRITE AN OFFER

Things you should do

• Get a current letter of pre-qualification from your lender.
• Have funds available to write a check for earnest money.
• Check out crime and school statistics online.
• Visit the local grocery store.
• Check out and enjoy the local amenities.

Things I will do

• Call the listing agent.
• Pull comparable sales.
• Negotiate the price.
• Collect your earnest money.
• Handle any contingencies.

Negotiations

• I am your poker face—I will represent you to the sellers’ agent. Do not contact the seller directly.
• How aggressive the offer should be depends on the supply and demand in the market.
• We will discuss the best offer for the property you find.
• Remember that in 2016 the average sales price came in at 98% of asking price on all sales.
• The details of what price to offer, whether to ask the seller to pay closing costs and how much or any other date considerations, contingencies or inclusions we will discuss at the time of the offer to get you the best deal possible.

havemeier-homes-graphic

THE CONTRACT

Once you have found your dream home, you will need to determine how much you would like to offer. Remember: the more competition there is for the house, the higher the offer should be, and occasionally this may exceed the asking price. The next step will be presenting the Listing Agent with a written offer. When an offer is accepted by the seller, it becomes a legal contract; therefore when you submit an offer, be prepared to pay an Earnest Money deposit. This deposit will guarantee your intention is to purchase the property. The seller may now stop considering other offers, knowing yours is valid and serious. After Kendra presents your offer to the Listing Agent, it will be accepted, rejected, or the seller will suggest a counter offer. Negotiation of terms will begin, if appropriate. During this time, the property should be professionally inspected. The contract procedure for most single-family home purchases is standard and followed quite closely by most builders and REALTORS®.

The Purchase Agreement used is a standard document approved by the Grand Rapid Administration. Buyers may retain lawyers to review the transaction contract, yet this is not necessary if represented by an Agent. Bellabay Realty has more experience writing and negotiating real estate contracts than the average real estate office. The Purchase Agreement constitutes your offer to buy, and once accepted by the Seller, becomes a valid, legal contract. It is essential to understand what is written on the contract offer, which will be prepared according to your instruction. In general, the contract requires your name, tenancy, Earnest Money deposit, inclusions and exclusions, Title Insurance policy, date for closing, purchase price and terms, date of possession, and signatures.

This refers to the name under which you wish to take title. Please read the section detailing Title. Many people use their full legal name; keep in mind that you must use this same name to transfer title or sell the property.

This refers to how you “take title” to the property. It signifies your interest in the property and your rights of survivorship. How you take title to a property is a legal decision, therefore you may wish to discuss which form of tenancy is best with your attorney. Your Agent cannot, legally, advise you how to take title.

The amount of Earnest Money due varies with the value of the property and is negotiable. The range is usually between 1 to 5%, and is rarely less than $1000.00. Its purpose is to show good faith that your offer is serious. It also serves as a source of payment for damages to the seller, should you default on the terms of the contract. A personal check is sufficient and should be made payable to the real estate company or the closing agent.

The legal description is the technical information from the government regarding plant location, section, etc. The street address is the information you will be familiar with.

This section details the agreed purchase amount, terms of down payment, loan amount, interest rate, and any other loan conditions. A description of the loan will be required. In new construction, the builder will most likely provide specific loans with terms detailed by the company. If you have not yet received loan approval, you need to specify the interest rate, loan conditions, and down payment limits which are acceptable to you.

This section details all items that are not permanently attached to the real property. Two conditions may apply: the items may be included in the purchase price, or the seller may choose not to include the items. Some examples of these items are window coverings, refrigerators, stoves, dishwashers, microwaves, sheds, dog houses, and garage door openers.

The contract should detail all liens, encumbrances, easements, restrictions, etc., which are not recorded. You should have someone explain the liens, encumbrances, etc., which are recorded.

Any special assessments should be revealed by the seller. For example, if a property recently received a special assessment to build new sewers, issues to be addressed include payment, time line, etc.

havemeier-homes-graphic

You retain the right to request a physical inspection of the property and its inclusions. If the inspection proves unsatisfactory, an established time is granted to purchaser and seller to reach a settlement of for corrections.

A title insurance policy is required by the lender, which is paid for by seller. The buyer is required to purchase a mortgagee policy; these fees will be included in your closing costs.

The closing date will be scheduled after all financing and inspection contingencies have been met. This time in the contract process if referred to as a “Good Funds” state, meaning all moneys at closing must be certified funds (cash, electronic transfers, certified check, Cashier’s check). You will be notified prior to closing of the amount you will need, so you have ample time to obtain your funds.

It is customary for all monies and documents to be handled by the Title Company (i.e. the closing agent). The closing agent acts as a depository for funds: they disburse funds to the proper parties and handle the adjustment of taxes and insurance between buyer and seller. They are also responsible for obtaining pertinent documents including deed and title insurance policies, and are responsible for the recording of documents with the state.

This information addresses consequences if the seller should not relinquish occupancy.

Although this date is negotiable between the buyer and seller, it is customary for possession to occur on or up to 3 to 5 days after closing.

This information addresses consequences if the seller should not relinquish occupancy.

This is where you put all items which may be in doubt or which could be contested later. For example, what fixtures go with the house? If it is a new home, does the builder assume any responsibility for corrective work? Is there something that must be done before you will buy the house? If so, put each item in a “Contingency Clause.”

Michigan state law requires that the offer and acceptance must be in writing. If acknowledged in the body of the contract, fax signatures will be binding until original signatures are obtained.

THE CONTRACT

Once you have found your dream home, you will need to determine how much you would like to offer. Remember: the more competition there is for the house, the higher the offer should be, and occasionally this may exceed the asking price. The next step will be presenting the Listing Agent with a written offer. When an offer is accepted by the seller, it becomes a legal contract; therefore when you submit an offer, be prepared to pay an Earnest Money deposit. This deposit will guarantee your intention is to purchase the property. The seller may now stop considering other offers, knowing yours is valid and serious. After Kendra presents your offer to the Listing Agent, it will be accepted, rejected, or the seller will suggest a counter offer. Negotiation of terms will begin, if appropriate. During this time, the property should be professionally inspected. The contract procedure for most single-family home purchases is standard and followed quite closely by most builders and REALTORS®.

The Purchase Agreement used is a standard document approved by the Grand Rapid Administration. Buyers may retain lawyers to review the transaction contract, yet this is not necessary if represented by an Agent. Bellabay Realty has more experience writing and negotiating real estate contracts than the average real estate office. The Purchase Agreement constitutes your offer to buy, and once accepted by the Seller, becomes a valid, legal contract. It is essential to understand what is written on the contract offer, which will be prepared according to your instruction. In general, the contract requires your name, tenancy, Earnest Money deposit, inclusions and exclusions, Title Insurance policy, date for closing, purchase price and terms, date of possession, and signatures.

This refers to the name under which you wish to take title. Please read the section detailing Title. Many people use their full legal name; keep in mind that you must use this same name to transfer title or sell the property.

This refers to how you “take title” to the property. It signifies your interest in the property and your rights of survivorship. How you take title to a property is a legal decision, therefore you may wish to discuss which form of tenancy is best with your attorney. Your Agent cannot, legally, advise you how to take title.

The amount of Earnest Money due varies with the value of the property and is negotiable. The range is usually between 1 to 5%, and is rarely less than $1000.00. Its purpose is to show good faith that your offer is serious. It also serves as a source of payment for damages to the seller, should you default on the terms of the contract. A personal check is sufficient and should be made payable to the real estate company or the closing agent.

The legal description is the technical information from the government regarding plant location, section, etc. The street address is the information you will be familiar with.

This section details the agreed purchase amount, terms of down payment, loan amount, interest rate, and any other loan conditions. A description of the loan will be required. In new construction, the builder will most likely provide specific loans with terms detailed by the company. If you have not yet received loan approval, you need to specify the interest rate, loan conditions, and down payment limits which are acceptable to you.

This section details all items that are not permanently attached to the real property. Two conditions may apply: the items may be included in the purchase price, or the seller may choose not to include the items. Some examples of these items are window coverings, refrigerators, stoves, dishwashers, microwaves, sheds, dog houses, and garage door openers.

The contract should detail all liens, encumbrances, easements, restrictions, etc., which are not recorded. You should have someone explain the liens, encumbrances, etc., which are recorded.

Any special assessments should be revealed by the seller. For example, if a property recently received a special assessment to build new sewers, issues to be addressed include payment, time line, etc.

You retain the right to request a physical inspection of the property and its inclusions. If the inspection proves unsatisfactory, an established time is granted to purchaser and seller to reach a settlement of for corrections.

A title insurance policy is required by the lender, which is paid for by seller. The buyer is required to purchase a mortgagee policy; these fees will be included in your closing costs.

The closing date will be scheduled after all financing and inspection contingencies have been met. This time in the contract process if referred to as a “Good Funds” state, meaning all moneys at closing must be certified funds (cash, electronic transfers, certified check, Cashier’s check). You will be notified prior to closing of the amount you will need, so you have ample time to obtain your funds.

It is customary for all monies and documents to be handled by the Title Company (i.e. the closing agent). The closing agent acts as a depository for funds: they disburse funds to the proper parties and handle the adjustment of taxes and insurance between buyer and seller. They are also responsible for obtaining pertinent documents including deed and title insurance policies, and are responsible for the recording of documents with the state.

This information addresses consequences if the seller should not relinquish occupancy.

Although this date is negotiable between the buyer and seller, it is customary for possession to occur on or up to 3 to 5 days after closing.

This information addresses consequences if the seller should not relinquish occupancy.

This is where you put all items which may be in doubt or which could be contested later. For example, what fixtures go with the house? If it is a new home, does the builder assume any responsibility for corrective work? Is there something that must be done before you will buy the house? If so, put each item in a “Contingency Clause.”

Michigan state law requires that the offer and acceptance must be in writing. If acknowledged in the body of the contract, fax signatures will be binding until original signatures are obtained.

After Your Offer is Accepted

First Week

• Earnest-money check deposited within 48 hours
• Make loan application.
• Arrange for property inspections.

Third Week

• Confirm that repairs have been completed.
• Promptly deliver any additional information your lender requests.
• Appraisal is complete (could be in Week 4.)
• Review any Home Owner’s Association (H.O.A.) documents.

Second Week

• Attend property inspections.
• Make repair requests to seller.
• Confirm that all information requested by the mortgage company has been submitted.

Fourth Week

• Walk through home to verify completed repairs.
• Arrange for cashier’s check for closing.
• Arrange for settlement and signing of papers.
• Arrange for transfer of utilities.

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